Thursday, 17 November 2016

Hodsock Priory, 20th February 2004

The best place near our home to view snowdrops in a beautiful environment is Hodsock Priory near Blyth in North Nottinghamshire. I have featured the gardens several times. I came across several twelve year old photographs that may be of interest.

As can be seen, there used to be a marquee tent used for refreshments where now the rather plush dining hall stands. Looking at the displays of snowdrops in this 2004 image, the display seems not so plush as last season!
Sam Arnott snowdrops in profusion and offered for sale. Now I realise where I first obtained my own supply. They have certainly spread in our garden providing our most profuse variety.
The display of snowdrops here fanning out in the lawns is more dense now, particularly special when viewed from the house itself or, more usually, from the top garden.
The display of Leucojum vernum has improved markedly over the years, the bulbs reveling in the moist soil by the lake. The Sarcococca shrubs are still there, though larger now and even more intensely fragrant.
The silver birch on the other side of the lake provide a striking white.
And here I am posing in the shades like some sad skier without snow.
The woodlands always look good. And I still wear the same jacket! Quality lasts.
This raised bank provides an ideal viewing point for the massed snowdrops. 

4 comments:

  1. We usually try to go snowdrop visiting in February each year. Hodstock Priory looks a wonderful place to visit, but a bit far for us in the South West. I will look forward to your photos next February !

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  2. The South West has some lovely gardens in February, Pauline - rather warmer than Yorkshire. I believe I might be reviewing some gardens for Silver Travel Adviser at that time.

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  3. Massed snowdrops are entrancing - that's something you'd never see in Southern California!

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  4. We do actually get some of the bright blooms of your garden followed by an often expensive scramble to retain them for the winter. Your garden looks a treat, Kris.

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